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Posted: Wednesday, May 1, 2019

Accessibility Tip: Hyperlinks

When adding links to documents or slides, there are some specific things you can do to optimize accessibility. Because screen-reading software reads the links presented on a web page as words or letters, it is important to make links meaningful and relevant. Links that say “click here,” for example, do not allow users to discern what the link is about. And screen-reading software reads URLs letter by letter, including punctuation such as slashes, colons, and periods.

Instead, embed your links within your text, choosing words and phrases that best describe the object of the link. Here are some examples:

Correct example: Please read this Washington Post article about ice loss in Antarctica.

Correct example: Please read this Washington Post article about ice loss in Antarctica.

Incorrect example: Please read this Washington Post article about ice loss in Antarctica. (https://www.washingtonpost.com/energy-environment/2019/01/14/ice-loss-antarctica-has-sextupled-since-s-new-research-finds/?utm_term=.734f543a9ff6)

Incorrect example: Please read this Washington Post article about ice loss in Antarctica.

Incorrect example: Please read this Washington Post article about ice loss in Antarctica.

This web page from the University of Minnesota gives some great examples of what screen readers actually read. Even if you don't read the entire article (though it is short), please scroll down to see the examples.

Please look for scheduled accessibility workshops in the Workshop Registration System. You may request training for yourself or for your group through the IT self-service portal.

Submitted by: Melissa J Miszkiewicz
Also appeared:
Thursday, May 2, 2019
Friday, May 3, 2019
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